DALIP BHAGWAN SINGH v. PUBLIC PROSECUTOR

Case Citator

[1997] 4 CLJ 645    Save to MyCLJ

PDF


DALIP BHAGWAN SINGH v. PUBLIC PROSECUTOR
FEDERAL COURT, KUALA LUMPUR
EUSOFF CHIN CJ PEH SWEE CHIN FCJ WAN ADNAN FCJ
[CRIMINAL REFERENCE NO: 06-3-91]
4 NOVEMBER 1997

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: Courts – Federal Court – Stare decisis – Principles and application – Power to depart from previous decisions – Whether later decision prevails over earlier decision – Whether decision of panel with more than three members has more weight than decision of panel with three members – Whether courts below may refuse to apply ratio of latest Federal Court decision and adopt ratio of an earlier Federal Court decision

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: Courts – Court of Appeal – Stare decisis – Principles and application – Whether bound by its own previous decisions – Exceptions – Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd – Whether may choose between its previous conflicting decisions irrespective of their dates

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: Courts – Stare decisis – High Court – Courts below Court of Appeal – Whether to follow exceptions in Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd – Whether may choose between conflicting decisions irrespective of their dates

EVIDENCE: Standard of proof – Close of prosecution – Prima facie test – Whether trial judge entitled to assess and weigh reliability, credibility and veracity of prosecution witnesses

EVIDENCE: Corroboration – Accomplice evidence – Whether mere act of trial judge warning himself sufficient to prevent conviction from being quashed – Whether trial judge must go on to say that case was proven beyond reasonable doubt – Whether appellate judge may reverse acquittal without dealing with reason given by trial judge on need for corroboration

CRIMINAL PROCEDURE: Prosecution – Close of prosecution – Criminal Procedure Code (Amendment) Act 1997 – Whether retrospective – Whether only applicable to acts or omissions committed on or after 31 January 1997

CRIMINAL PROCEDURE: Prosecution – Close of prosecution – Acts or omissions committed before 31 January 1997 – Standard of proof required – Whether ‘beyond reasonable doubt’ standard still applicable – Ratio in Arulpragasan Sandaraju v. PP – Whether retrospective

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW: Fundamental liberties – Retrospective legislation – Presumption in respect of legislation on substantive law – Presumption in respect of legislation on evidence and procedural law – Vested rights – Federal Constitution, art. 7 – Power of legislature to make retrospective civil and criminal law

The applicant was charged in the Sessions Court with an offence of cheating (alleged to have taken place in 1983) but was acquitted and discharged in 1985 at the close of the case for the prosecution without his defence being called. On appeal by the Public Prosecutor, the High Court set aside the order of acquittal and ordered a retrial. At the retrial, the applicant was, again, acquitted and discharged by the Sessions Court at the close of the case for the prosecution without his defence being called. The Public Prosecutor appealed and, once again, the High Court set aside the order of acquittal and ordered the applicant to enter on his defence. Dissatisfied, the applicant applied for leave to refer certain questions of law to the Supreme Court. In 1991, the Supreme Court allowed the application in respect of the following questions of law: (i) whether, in an appeal against an acquittal at the close of the case for the prosecution, an appellate judge may refuse to apply, with or without assigning any reasons, the latest decision of the Supreme Court on a point of law and adopt an earlier decision of the Federal Court; (ii) whether, in hearing the appeal against the acquittal at the close of the case for the prosecution, the High Court was right in law in holding that the Sessions Court was wrong to have assessed and weighed the reliability, credibility and veracity of the prosecution witnesses; and (iii) whether, in an appeal against an acquittal, where the trial judge finds corroboration to be necessary on an essential ingredient of the charge, an appellate judge may reverse the order of acquittal without dealing with the reason given by the trial judge on the need for such corroboration.

Held: Per Peh Swee Chin FCJ

[1] The doctrine of stare decisis dictates that a court, other than the highest court, is obliged generally to follow the decisions of the courts at a higher level or at the same level. There are, however, exceptions to this general rule, especially those affecting the Court of Appeal. These exceptions, as embodied in Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd, are part of the Malaysian common law by virtue of s. 3 of the Civil Law Act 1956. It is also possible to have further exceptions as long as they are not inconsistent with the ones established in Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd.

[1a] The Court of Appeal is, as a general rule, bound by its own decisions. The three exceptions enunciated in Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd are: (i) a decision of the Court of Appeal given per incuriam need not be followed; (ii) when faced with a conflict in respect of its own previous decisions, the Court of Appeal may choose which decision to follow irrespective of the dates of those decisions; and (iii) the Court of Appeal ought not to follow its own previous decisions if such decisions are, expressly or by necessary implication, overruled by the Federal Court, or if they cannot stand with a decision of the Federal Court. In respect of exception (i) above, the words “per incuriam” are to be interpreted narrowly to mean a “… decision given in ignorance or forgetfulness of some inconsistent statutory provision or of some authority binding in the court concerned…”

[1b] Courts in the tiers below the Court of Appeal cannot rely on the ‘per incuriam exception’ applied by the Court of Appeal for itself, but may choose between two conflicting decisions irrespective of the dates of those conflicting decisions.

[1c] Although the Practice Statement (Judicial Precedent) 1966 issued by the House of Lords is not binding on the Federal Court, it has, indeed, and in practice, been followed. The Federal Court (and its forerunner the Supreme Court) has never refused to depart from its own previous decisions when it appeared right to do so. This power to depart should be, and always has been, exercised sparingly. In contrast, the power to depart is indicated when a previous decision sought to be overruled is wrong, uncertain, unjust, outmoded or obsolete in modern conditions.

[1d] The effect or weight of a decision of a panel of the Federal Court comprising more than three members or a ‘full court’ and that of an ordinarily constituted quorum comprising three members is the same.

[1e] When two decisions of the Federal Court conflict, on a point of law, the later decision prevails over the earlier decision.

[1f] Consequently, and in answer to question (i) of the reference, in an appeal against an acquittal at the close of the case for the prosecution, an appellate judge may not refuse to apply the latest decision of the Federal Court on a point of law and adopt an earlier decision of the same court.

[2] At the time of the hearing of the appeal in the High Court against the Sessions Court’s order of acquittal, the standard of proof required of the prosecution at the close of its case was still the ‘prima facie‘ standard. The dicta in the cases of Munusamy v. PP, PP v. Chin Yoke – which formed the bedrock of the ‘prima facie‘ test – would disentitle a judge from assessing the veracity or credibility of the prosecution witnesses at that stage.

[2a] Consequently, and in answer to question (ii) of the reference, the High Court was right in law in holding that the Sessions Court was wrong to have assessed and weighed the reliability, credibility and veracity of the prosecution witnesses.

[3] It is a well-known rule that a judge must warn himself of the danger of convicting an accused person on the evidence of an accomplice unless such evidence is corroborated; in the absence of such a warning, an appellate court will quash the conviction. The mere act of a judge warning himself is not sufficient to prevent the quashing of the conviction if the judge, without the necessary corroborative evidence, nonetheless decides to convict because he is convinced by the accomplice’s evidence despite the risks, unless, the judge goes on further to say that the case has been proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

[3a] In the present case, the complainant was not an accomplice to the applicant in respect of the charge against the applicant which was one of cheating. However, by virtue of s 146(c) of the Evidence Act 1950, the evidence of the complainant would still have to be treated with some caution as he was a person of bad character.

[3b] Consequently, and in answer to question (iii) of the reference, in an appeal against an acquittal, where the trial judge finds corroboration to be necessary on an essential ingredient of the charge, an appellate judge may reverse the order of acquittal without dealing with the reason given by the trial judge on the need for such corroboration, provided, there is undoubtedly sufficient evidence by itself or overwhelming evidence from elsewhere to prove a case against the accused beyond a reasonable doubt.

[4] The amendments made by the Criminal Procedure Code (Amendment) Act 1997 to ss. 173(f) and 180 of the Criminal Procedure Code apply only to an act or omission constituting a criminal offence committed on or after 31 January 1997. The amendments are not retrospective in operation. [4a] In respect of an act or omission committed before 31 January 1997, the standard of proof required of the prosecution at the close of its case is still the ‘beyond reasonable doubt’ standard as promulgated in CLJ 1996 4 597 Arulpragasan Sandaraju v. PP has, practically, retrospective effect.

[5] In respect of legislation on substantive law, there is a rule of presumption that it is not retrospective in operation in the absence of a contrary intention by express words or by necessary implication. Conversely, in respect of legislation on evidence or procedure, the presumption is that it is retrospective in operation in the absence of a contrary intention, unless, the application of such legislation deprives a person of a vested right and offends art. 7 of the Federal Constitution.

[6] Parliament has plenary power to make retrospective criminal and civil law; however, when it makes retrospective criminal law, it must steer clear of art. 7 of the Federal Constitution.

[Order of High Court set aside; Sessions Court’s order of acquittal restored; applicant acquitted and discharged.]

[Bahasa Malaysia Translation of Headnotes]

UNDANG-UNDANG PERLEMBAGAAN: Mahkamah – Mahkamah Persekutuan – Ikatan duluan – Prinsip dan pemakaian – Kuasa untuk menolak keputusan terdahulu – Samada keputusan terakhir mengatasi keputusan terdahulu – Sama ada keputusan panel terdiri dari lebih dari tiga orang ahli mempunyai kekuatan yang lebih dari panel yang terdiri dari tiga orang ahli sahaja – Samada mahkamah bawahan boleh enggan memakai keputusan terakhir Mahkamah Persekutuan dan sebaliknya memakai ratio dalam keputusan terdahulu Mahkamah Persekututan

UNDANG-UNDANG PERLEMBAGAAN: Mahkamah – Mahkamah Rayuan – Ikatan duluan – Prinsip dan pemakaian – Samada ianya terikat dengan keputusannya yang terdahulu – Pengecualian – Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd – Samada boleh memilih di antara keputusannya terdahulu yang bercanggah tanpa mengira tarikhnya

UNDANG-UNDANG PERLEMBAGAAN: Mahkamah – Ikatan duluan – Mahkamah Tinggi – Mahkamah di bawah Mahkamah Rayuan – Samada untuk mengikut pengecualian dalam Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd – Samada boleh memilih di antara keputusan-keputusan yang bercanggah tanpa mengira tarikhnya

KETERANGAN : Darjah pembuktian – Akhir kes pendakwaan – Ujian prima facie – Samada mahkamah perbicaraan dibenarkan menilaikan dan menimbangkan keyakinan, kebolehpercayaan dan kebenaran cakap saksi pendakwa

KETERANGAN: Sokongan – Keterangan rakan jenayah – Sama ada tindakan hakim perbicaraan memberi amaran semata-mata kepada dirinya sendiri adalah cukup untuk mencegah pembatalan sabitan – Sama ada hakim perbicaraan harus terus menyatakan bahawa kes telah dibuktikan tanpa keraguan munasabah – Sama ada hakim rayuan boleh mengakaskan pembebasan tanpa membincangkan sebab yang diberikan oleh hakim perbicaraan berkenaan dengan perlunya sokongan

ACARA JENAYAH: Pendakwaan – Akhir kes pendakwaan – Akta (Pindann) Kanun Acara Jenayah 1997 – Samada secara kebelakangan – Samada hanya terpakai kepada tindakan ataupun peninggalan yang dilakukan pada ataupun selepas 31 Januari 1997

ACARA JENAYAH : Pendakwaan – Akhir kes pendakwaan – Tindakan ataupun peninggalan yang dilakukan sebelum 31 Januari 1997 – Darjah pembuktian yang diperlukan – Samada darjah ‘tanpa keraguan yang munasabah’ masih terpakai – Ratio dalam Arulpragasan Sandaraju v. PP – Samada secara kebelakangan

UNDANG-UNDANG PERLEMBAGAAN : Hak-hak asasi – Perundangan secara kebelakangan – Anggapan berkenaan dengan perundangan berkenaan dengan undang-undang substantif – Anggapan berkenaan dengan perundangan undang-undang keterangan dan prosedur – Hak-hak kukuh – Perlembagaan Persekutuan perkara 7 – Kuasa badan perundangan dalam menggubal undangundang sivil dan jenayah yang beroperasi secara kebelakangan

Pemohon telah dituduh di Mahkamah Sesyen dengan kesalahan menipu (yang dikatakan telah dilakukan dalam tahun 1993) tetapi telah dibebaskan dan dilepaskan dalam tahun 1985 pada akhir kes pendakwaan tanpa pembelaannya dipanggil. Atas rayuan pihak pendakwa, Mahkamah Tinggi telah mengetepikan perintah pembebasan dan memerintahkan perbicaraan semula. Semasa perbicaraan semula, pemohon telah sekali lagi dibebaskan dan dilepaskan oleh Mahkamah Sesyen di akhir kes pendakwaan tanpa pembelaannya dipanggil. Pihak pendakwa telah merayu dan sekali lagi Mahkamah Tinggi telah mengetepikan perintah pembebasan dan telah memerintahkan supaya pemohon memasukkan pembelaannya. Oleh kerana tidak puas hati, pemohon telah memohon untuk kebenaran untuk merujuk beberapa persoalan undang-undang kepada Mahkamah Agung. Dalam tahun 1991, Mahkamah Agung telah membenarkan permohonan berkenaan dengan persoalan undang-undang berikut: (i) samada, dalam suatu rayuan terhadap pembebasan di akhir kes pendakwaan, hakim rayuan boleh enggan memakai, tanpa ataupun dengan sebab-sebab, keputusan terakhir Mahkamah Agung atas persoalan undang-undang dan sebaliknya memakai keputusan terdahulu Mahkamah Persekutuan; (ii) samada, dalam mendengarkan rayuan terhadap pembebasan di akhir kes pendakwaan, Mahkamah Tinggi adalah betul dalam memutuskan bahawa Mahkamah Sesyen adalah salah kerana telah menilaikan dan menimbangkan keyakinan, kebolehpercayaan dan kebenaran cakap saksi pendakwa; dan (iii) samada, dalam rayuan terhadap pembebasan, di mana hakim perbicaraan telah memutuskan bahawa sokongan adalah perlu untuk suatu unsur penting pertuduhan tersebut, hakim rayuan boleh mengakaskan perintah pembebasan tanpa membincangkan sebab yang diberikan oleh hakim perbicaraan atas keperluan sokongan tersebut.

Diputuskan: Oleh Peh Swee Chin HMP

[1] Menurut doktrin ikatan duluan, pada amnya, kecuali mahkamah yang tertinggi, mahkamah adalah wajib mengikut keputusan mahkamah yang berada pada tahap yang sama ataupun yang lebih tinggi. Walaubagaimanapun, terdapat pengecualian kepada peraturan am ini, terutama yang menjejaskan Mahkamah Rayuan, seperti yang terdapat dalam kes Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd yang menjadi adalah sebahagian daripada common law Malaysia menurut s 3 Akta Undangundang Sivil 1956. Mungkin terdapat pengecualian-pengecualian selanjutnya asalkan mereka adalah selaras dengan prinsip-prinsip yang diputuskan dalam Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd.

[1a] Sebagai peraturan am, Mahkamah Rayuan adalah terikat dengan keputusan sendiri. Tiga pengecualian yang diputuskan dalam Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd adalah: (i) keputusan Mahkamah Rayuan yang diberikan per incuriam tidak perlu diikut; (ii) apabila berhadapan dengan konflik berkenaan dengan keputusannya sendiri yang terdahulu, Mahkamah Rayuan boleh memilih keputusan yang mana hendak diikut, tanpa mengira tarikh keputusan diberikan; dan (iii) Mahkamah Rayuan tidak patut mengikuti keputusannya sendiri yang terdahulu jikalau keputusannya sendiri yang terdahulu itu, secara ternyata ataupun tersirat, telah ditolak oleh Mahkamah Persekutuan, ataupun jikalau ianya tidak selaras dengan keputusan Mahkamah Persekutuan. Berkenaan dengan pengecualian (i) di atas, perkataan-perkataan ‘per incuram’ harus ditafsirkan secara sempit yang memberikan makna ‘suatu keputusan yang diberi tanpa menyedari ataupun dengan melupakan suatu peruntukan statut yang tidak selaras ataupun berkenaan dengan nas yang mengikat dalam mahkamah yang berkenaan.

[1b] Mahkamah yang berada pada tahap di bawah Mahkamah Rayuan tidak boleh bergantung kepada pengecualian ‘per incuriam’ yang dipakai oleh Mahkamah Rayuan untuk dirinya sendiri, tetapi boleh memilih di antara dua keputusan yang bercanggah, tanpa mengira tarikh keputusan yang bercanggah itu.

[1c] Walaupun Pernyataan Amalan (Duluan Kehakiman) 1966 yang keluarkan oleh House of Lords adalah tidak mengikat Mahkamah Persekutuan, secara amalan, ianya telah diikut. Mahkamah Persekutuan (dan mahkamah sebelumnya, iaitu Mahkamah Agung) tidak pernah enggan menolak keputusannya sendiri yang terdahulu apabila ianya kelihatan wajar untuk berbuat demikian. Kuasa untuk menolak hendaklah dan patut dilaksanakan secara sekali-sekala sahaja. Secara perbandingan, kuasa untuk menolak adalah jelas ketika keputusan terdahulu yang hendak ditolak itu adalah salah, kurang jelas, tidak adil dan tidak terpakai dalam keadaan-keadaan moden.

[1d] Kesan ataupun kekuatan keputusan panel Mahkamah Persekutuan yang terdiri lebih dari 3 orang ahli ataupun suatu ‘Mahkamah Penuh’ berbanding dengan koram biasa yang terdiri dari 3 orang ahli adalah sama.

[1e] Apabila terdapat dua keputusan Mahkamah Persekutuan yang bercanggah atas persoalan undang-undang, keputusan yang terakhir akan mengatasi keputusan yang terdahulu.

[1f] Oleh yang demikian, dan sebagai jawapan kepada persoalan (i) rujukan ini, dalam suatu rayuan terhadap pembebasan di akhir kes pendakwaan, seorang hakim rayuan tidak boleh enggan memakai keputusan terakhir Mahkamah Persekutuan atas suatu persoalan undang-undang dan sebaliknya memakai suatu keputusan terdahulu mahkamah yang sama.

[2] Semasa perbicaraan rayuan di Mahkamah Tinggi terhadap perintah pembebasan oleh Mahkamah Sesyen, darjah pembuktian yang diperlukan oleh pihak pendakwa pada akhir kesnya adalah darjah ‘prima facie’. Pernyataan dalam kes-kes Munusamy v. PP, Haw Tua Taw v. PP dan PP v. Chin Yoke – yang membentuk dasar ujian ‘prima facie’ akan menghalang hakim daripada menilaikan kebenaran cakap dan kebolehpercayaan saksi-saksi pendakwa pada tahap itu.

[2a] Oleh yang demikian, dan sebagai jawapan kepada persoalan (ii) rujukan ini, Mahkamah Tinggi adalah betul dari segi undang-undang dalam memutuskan bahawa Mahkamah Sesyen adalah salah kerana telah menilaikan dan menimbangkan keyakinan, kebolehpercayaan dan kebenaran cakap saksi-saksi pendakwa. [3] Ianya merupakan peraturan yang mantap bahawa hakim patut memberi amaran kepada dirinya sendiri akan bahayanya mensabitkan seseorang tertuduh berdasarkan keterangan rakan jenayah kecuali jikalau keterangan tersebut disokong; tanpa amaran tersebut, suatu mahkamah rayuan akan membatalkan sabitan tersebut. Tindakan hakim semata-mata untuk memberikan amaran kepada dirinya sendiri adalah tidak cukup untuk menghalang pembatalan sabitan, jikalau hakim, tanpa keterangan sokongan yang perlu itu, telah memutuskan walau bagaimanapun untuk mensabitkan kerana dia telah mempercayai keterangan rakan sejenayah walaupun terdapat risiko, kecuali jikalau hakim selanjutnya menyatakan bahawa kes tersebut dibuktikan tanpa keraguan yang munasabah.

[3a] Dalam kes ini, pengadu bukanlah seorang rakan jenayah pemohon berkenaan dengan pertuduhan terhadap pemohon, iaitu penipuan. Walau bagaimanapun, berdasarkan s. 146(c) Akta Keterangan 1950, keterangan pengadu harus dikendalikan secara berhati-hati kerana dia merupakan seorang yang berwatak buruk.

[3b] Dengan yang demikian dan sebagai jawapan kepada persoalan (ii) rujukan ini, dalam rayuan terhadap pembebasan, di mana hakim perbicaraan mendapati bahawa sokongan adalah perlu untuk unsur penting dalam pertuduhan tersebut, maka hakim rayuan boleh mengakaskan perintah pembebasan tanpa membincangkan sebab yang diberikan oleh hakim perbicaraan untuk sokongan tersebut, asalkan, tanpa keraguan, terdapat keterangan yang dengan sendirinya ataupun keterangan yang kuat dari mana-mana punca lain yang dapat membuktikan kes terhadap tertuduh tanpa keraguan yang munasabah.

[4] Pindaan yang dibuat oleh Akta (Pindaan) Kanun Acara Jenayah 1997 kepada s 173(f) dan s. 180 Kanun Acara Jenayah hanya terpakai kepada tindakan ataupun peninggalan yang terjumlah kepada suatu kesalahan jenayah pada ataupun selepas 31 Januari 1997. Pindaan tersebut adalah tidak beroperasi secara kebelakangan.

[4a] Berkenaan tindakan ataupun peninggalan yang dilakukan sebelum 31 Januari 1997, darjah pembuktian yang diperlukan di pihak pendakwaan pada akhir kesnya masih adalah darjah tanpa keraguan yang munasabah seperti yang dinyatakan dalam CLJ 1996 4 597 Arulpragasan Sandaraju v. PP dari segi amalan mempunyai kesan kebelakangan.

[5] Berkenaan dengan perundangan atas undang-undang substantif, terdapatnya suatu peraturan anggapan bahawa ianya tidak beroperasi secara kebelakangan tanpa niat yang menyatakan sebaliknya oleh perkataan-perkataan yang nyata ataupun secara tersirat. Secara perbandingan, berkenaan dengan perundangan undang-undang keterangan dan prosedur, anggapannya adalah bahawa ianya beroperasi secara kebelakangan jikalau tidak ada niat yang bertentangan, kecuali jikalau pemakaian perundangan tersebut melucutkan hak kukuh seseorang itu dan melanggar perkara 7 Perlembagaan Persekutuan.

[6] Parlimen mempunyai kuasa pleno untuk menggubal undang-undang sivil dan jenayah secara kebelakangan; walau bagaimanapun, ketika ianya menggubal undang-undang jenayah secara kebelakangan, ianya patut mengelakkan perkara 7 Perlembagaan Persekutuan.

[Perintah Mahkamah Tinggi diketepikan; perintah pembebasan Mahkamah Sesyen dihidupkan; pemohon dibebaskan dan dilepaskan.]

Cases referred to:

Munusamy v. PP [1999] 1 CLJ 783

PP v. Chin Yoke [1940] MLJ 37 (refd)

Haw Tua Tau v. PP [1981] 2 MLJ 49 (refd)

Arulpragasan Sandaraju v. PP [1996] 4 CLJ 597 (refd)

Khoo Hi Chiang v. PP [1994] 2 CLJ 151 (cit)

Tan Boon Kean v. PP [1995] 4 CLJ 456 (cit)

Young v. Bristol Aeroplane Co Ltd [1944] KB 718 (foll)

Morelle v. Wakeling [1955] 2 QB 379 (foll)

Cassell & Co v. Broome [1972] AC 1027 (foll)

London Tramways v. London County Council [1898] AC 375 (refd)

Reg v. National Insurance Comissioner, ex p Hudson [1972] AC 944 (refd)

Loh Kooi Choon v. Government of Malaysia [1975] 1 LNS 90

Chiu Nan Hong v. PP [1965] MLJ 40 (cit)

Legislation referred to:

Civil Law Act 1956, s. 3

Criminal Procedure Code, ss. 173(f), 180

Criminal Procedure Code (Amendment) Act 1997

Evidence Act 1950, s. 146(c)

Federal Constitution, art. 7(1)

[Appeal from High Court Malaya, Kuala Lumpur; Criminal Appeal Bil: 52-61-88]

Counsel:

For the applicant – Gurbachan Singh; M/s Bachan & Kartar

For the respondent – Mohd Yusof Zainal Abidin, DPP; A-G’s Chambers

[Order of High Court set aside; Sessions Court’s order of acquittal restored;

applicant acquitted and discharged.]

[Perintah Mahkamah Tinggi diketepikan; perintah pembebasan Mahkamah

Sesyen dihidupkan; pemohon dibebaskan dan dilepaskan.]

This entry was posted in Referred in Azhar Osman's case and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.